JCL Monograph Series NO.23 专著系列 23 卷 – 2009

Cumulative indexes and abstracts to Journal of Chinese Linguistics: Journal volumes 1-35 (1973-2007), Monograph series numbers 1-22 (1982-2007)
中国语言学报及专著: 综合索引及摘要 (1973-2007)
Compiled by Yifeng Wu 吴一丰 辑录

1973 was an exceptional year for me. With the kind help of Professor Lü Shuxiang of the Institute of Linguistics of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and of Professor Zhu Dexi of Peking University, I was able to return to China at last, after an absence of twenty-five years. Meeting all the famous linguists at Beida, and a tour arranged for me afterwards that took me all over China, these were truly incredible experiences. 1973 was the middle of the Cultural Revolution, and to land in the middle of a gigantic country in the throes of kaleidoscopic transitions set my head reeling for many months, even after I returned to Berkeley.

The Journal of Chinese Linguistics (JCL) was also launched in 1973. Professor Y.R.Chao was an inspiration from the beginning; to him we dedicated the very first issue of the journal, which I hand delivered to him at his home on Cragmont Avenue. Professor F.K.Li also gave us constant encouragement. In addition to revising his classic paper on the languages of China for publication as the first article in JCL, he also served as a JCL editor for many years. These founders of our field were pleased to see my effort at bridging traditional Chinese linguistics with linguistics-at-large in international scholarship.

Then, as now, both sides have much to gain from dialog – the interflow of data and of ideas.[1] Western scholarship has played a historic role in broadening the Chinese perspective in language study. Starting in the 1580s, with the dictionaries and romanizations of Matteo Ricci and Nicolas Trigault, to the extensive studies in Chinese dialectology and philology by Bernhard Karlgren in the early 20th century, European contributions have often been an important stimulus for Chinese linguistics. Indeed, the importance of some early studies is being appreciated only now, e.g., Conrady’s study of Sino-Tibetan morphology[2].

On the flip side, many insights on language from traditional Chinese scholarship are surfacing only recently for general consumption. One example is an early statement on grammatization made a thousand years ago – that the function words of today were content words in earlier times[3]. Indeed one can easily extend this insight that many words of today were phrases in earlier times, and the millennia of Chinese texts provide fertile ground for such studies. Another insight has to do with the hierarchical structure of the syllable.[4] But these insights aside, the more basic issue is that the languages of China, with their remarkable aspects of lexical tone, simple morphology, and their extraordinary time depth of textual evidence, are indispensable data for any general theory that aims to shed light on human language. How can it be otherwise?

Returning to JCL, after a little coaxing, the dean’s office at Berkeley, and the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C., both helped out with some seed money. This made it possible for me to get some student assistance. When funds ran low, we printed the journal with a crude dot-matrix printer, and wrote Chinese characters in by hand. The original plan of three issues per year turned out to be too ambitious for a fledgling journal, and we soon cut back to two issues. JCL started in a small corner of the old POLA house (Project on Linguistic Analysis), 2222 Piedmont Avenue, where there were often visitors from afar as well as stimulating workshops in Chinese linguistics. And there it managed for 35 years.

The worth of a journal depends critically on editorial judgments. In this respect, JCL has always been graced by the unstinting support of members of its editorial board and other reviewers, contributing generously simply as a labor of love. I mentioned Professor F.K.Li above; as one of the first Associate Editors, he helped set the high standard which we all followed. Among the others in the first panel, there were Lü Shuxiang from Beijing, Ted Pulleyblank from Vancouver, and C.C.Cheng from Urbana. There was also the late Mantaro Hashimoto, who did a PhD with me at the Ohio State University, and who actually taught me more than I did him.

The question had to be confronted at the outset – which characters and which romanization should JCL use? In line with Mainland usage, I chose Simplified Characters and Hanyu Pinyin as the default case. This was not acceptable to the political bureaucracy in Taiwan, and JCL was banned there for a while. During those years, friends told me that JCL was only accessible at government reading rooms. I was also told that this choice has placed me on certain black lists, even though I taught at National Taiwan University in 1965. But history has moved on, and such misunderstandings are laughable now.

Gratifying recognition of JCL’s international influence came when it made the ranks of both SSCI and AHCI. In 1982, JCL published its first monograph, based on the Berkeley PhD thesis of N.G.Chang. It was a study of 15th century Korean, of great importance to the study of Early Mandarin. It finds a distant echo 21 years later, in Monograph #20, on lexical diffusion in Korean and Sino-Korean. Some of the monographs were early forays into interdisciplinary research, such as #9 on natural language processing, and #13 on biolinguistics. Two monographs have been published in Chinese translation, such as #6, which is F.Masini’s study of the modern Chinese lexicon , and #8, which is my anthology of the ancestry of the Chinese language .

Over these 35 years, JCL pages accumulated. Well over four hundred articles have appeared, and even as I write this foreword, Monograph #23 is being prepared for publication, and Monograph #24 is undergoing review. We owe readers of JCL a systematic way of retrieving information easily and accurately from this massive wealth of scholarship in Chinese linguistics. An ideal way to provide this is the design of a user-friendly webpage. Such a project is underway, though various technical issues, such as the variety of font types, require more time. So an interim measure to serve this need is to compile a volume of Cumulative Indexes.

Several attempts to make such an Index were made earlier by various people in Berkeley. But such a massive project needs a period of concentrated and dedicated effort that was not possible then. A major change took place in 2007, when many of JCL’s operations moved to the Chinese University of Hong Kong, housed at the Center for East Asian Studies. The move was an extremely complex one. It had the valuable support, both moral and fiscal, from Professor K.L.So, Director of the Center.

But it was the painstaking planning and execution on the part of Ms.Yifeng Wu that made the complex move across the Pacific, and from one university to another, smooth and successful. Yifeng also set up collaboration with the Chinese University Press of Hong Kong, which now does the printing and distribution. In JCL’s new home, she finally had the resources to bring to successful fruition these long awaited Cumulative Indexes, which you now hold in your hand. Yifeng has been managing JCL since the 1990s. She received her B.A. in 1992 from Berkeley with a double major, in Chinese literature and in English literature. In addition, she holds a master’s degree (Library and Information Science) from San Jose State University, and is a professional librarian. She is also a translator of L.L.Cavalli-Sforza’s very successful book on human evolution . She brings to everything she does a sense of total commitment as well as a strong desire for perfection.

In compiling this hefty volume of Cumulative Indexes, Yifeng has been extremely conscientious in consulting a variety of colleagues, as detailed in her Acknowledgements. To maximize its usefulness, this volume has benefited from the advice sought from many viewpoints. I expect that for anyone working in Chinese linguistics, these Cumulative Indexes will surely earn a convenient place on his desk, ever ready as an indispensable reference tool. We are all indebted to her for rendering this valuable service to our field. This volume is a fitting landmark for 35 years of contributions from all its editors, reviewers, as well as numerous authors. And it will surely facilitate studies in our field for many years beyond.

William S-Y. Wang, March 2009
Chinese University of Hong Kong

NOTES
1. Lee, Thomas H.T. 2000. The bridging of linguistic research traditions. JCL 28.1, 116-162.
2 Mei 2009. 梅祖麟。康拉迪 (1864-1925)及汉藏语系的建立。Ms.
3 周伯琦: 今之虚字皆古之实字. Discussed on p.11 in Sun, Chaofen. 1996. Word-Order Change and Grammaticalization in the History of Chinese. Stanford University Press.
4 Tung, T.H. 1961. Recent studies in phonetics and phonology on China. Phonetica. 6, 216-228.
5 Tzeng, Ovid J.L. 2005. Remember those good old POLA days. Pp.i-iv in Ho, Dah-an and Ovid J.L.Tzeng, eds. POLA FOREVER. Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
6 黄河清 译。1997。 现代汉语词汇的形成。上海:汉语大词典出版社。
7 李葆佳 主译。2005。汉语的祖先。北京:中华书局。
8 追踪亚当夏娃。2003。台北:远流出版社。

Abstract 摘要
In compiling these JCL and JCLMS Cumulative Indexes 1973~2007 in the present form, we have been continuously seeking advice from scholars and experts; and we hope that these indexes can continue to receive feedback from our readers in order that we can be helpful to the research community. In this regard, we would like to thank wholeheartedly many people for their inspiration and support of the effort in creating and refining these indexes. Without the help of the following scholars and colleagues, the indexes could not have come to fruition: Professor William S.-Y. Wang 王士元, the editor of the Journal of Chinese Linguistics, has inspired the concept and given his direction and full support in every way to this effort for many years. Professor Ho Dah-an 何大安, of the Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica in Taiwan, has directed a group of young scholars, Mr. Huang Kuang-yuan 黃光遠, PhD candidates Ms. Ivy Yeh 葉尚芳, and Ms. Du Chia-lun 杜家倫, to proofread the contents of the indexes against the original texts of JCL and JCLMS; they provided invaluable suggestions and corrections.

Professor Robert S. Bauer包睿舜, not only has edited the English content of the indexes many times, but has also suggested titles for each section. Professor Thomas Hun-Tak Lee 李行德, of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has provided important books that played an invaluable role in the Chinese translation of the indexes. Professor Shen Zhongwei 沈钟伟, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, suggested referring to the index literature of Chinese linguistics and languages. Professor Weera Ostapirat 许家平, of Mahidol University at Salaya, Thailand, has examined the contents and raised keen questions for clarification. Dr. Liu Li 刘莉, of the University of California at Berkeley, raised some valuable questions about the subject classification and so inspired a major revision of it. Professor Wang Feng 汪锋, of Peking University in Beijing, has carefully rechecked the Chinese translations of article titles and then suggested that book titles reviewed in JCL be so indicated in certain sections. How this has been done is explained in Explanatory Notes to Index II. Professor Huang Chu-Ren 黄居仁, of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Academia Sinica, has suggested additionally indexing authors referenced by JCL articles in the section Names of Persons. Mr. Wong Ying Wai 黃英偉, PhD candidate at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has edited the manuscripts with excellent professional editing skills. Ms. Yu Kai余凯, a professional cataloging librarian, challenged us to insure the consistency in the transcription of the authors’ names in the Authors Index. Mr. Liu Yifeng 刘一峰and Ms. Liang Jinyu 梁金玉, two young students majoring in Electronic Engineering and Mathematics, respectively, at the University of California at Berkeley have diligently typed up all the contents of the indexes, and their efforts will fulfill our dream of putting the indexes online. Finally, we want to thank wholeheartedly Professor Billy Kee-long So 蘇基朗, director of Chinese Studies and the Centre for East Asian Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, for giving his full support to the well being of the Journal of Chinese Linguistics.

These indexes are now proffered to the academic community with our deep respect for the spirit of scholarship, with help from Mr. Kingsley Ma馬桂鴻, the production manager of Chinese University Press, for his professional advice on the high standard in the physical quality of this large volume. In acknowledging the invaluable assistance and suggestions that have been provided by all of these people, I must make clear that I bear the responsibility for any and all errors that remain in this volume. In this regard, I would like to seek readers’ advice on any mistakes and typographical errors that they find, so these errors can be corrected for a future edition.

Yifeng Wu 吴一丰, June 2009
Chinese University of Hong Kong

This volume is the culmination of our efforts to index Journal of Chinese Linguistics (JCL) and its Monograph Series (JCLMS) which were published by the Project on Linguistic Analysis from 1973 to 2007. It follows the same vision of as the Chinese Linguistics Bibliography on Computer (CLIBOC), which focused on a broader coverage in Chinese linguistic literature and was described as follows:

Owing to the vast amount of literature which deals with Chinese linguistics, there is a great need for a comprehensive bibliography on the subject. The availability of such a bibliography would free scholars from needless hours of searching through the literature for bibliographical references and allow them to utilize their time and talents more creatively comparing to the efforts on Dictionary on Computer (DOC). (Wang & Lyovin p.1, 1970)

This volume of JCL Cumulative Indexes aims to make conveniently all available published contents of JCL and JCLMS in a systematic, comprehensive, and referential format for the use of the scholarly community researching Chinese linguistics and language.

The indexes reflect the historical development of JCL and JCLMS. During the 20th century, China changed dramatically. Today China is finding its way in the light of globalization, developing its own exuberant cultural identities and making major contributions. For millennia China has been cultivating knowledge rooted in its own culture, and this naturally includes the Chinese language. This kind of regional knowledge with its own theories, hypotheses, analytical, and abundant data can enlighten the world of universal knowledge. This was exemplified by the vision of DOC ([Chinese Dialect] Dictionary on Computer), first brought to scholarly attention in 1969, through “the reconstruction of phonological history of the major Chinese dialects” (Wang, p.57). In other words, without the knowledge experienced by people from different geographical regions such as the regional languages used by the Chinese people, the knowledge may not be universal and can be crippled. Pioneering scholars of Chinese linguistics such as the editors, authors and reviewers of JCL have long dedicated themselves to “globalizing” the Chinese language in the field of linguistics, and thus manifesting the underlying principle in Professor William S.-Y. Wang’s vision (1969), “Of the many language families in the world, Chinese offers an ideal laboratory within which to study phonological change for many reasons” (Wang, p.58). Their works are an invaluable contribution to world knowledge.

The inaugural volume of the Journal of Chinese Linguistics was published in 1973; it was begun with a very clear visionary mission in mind, as the editor stated in that first volume:

“Chinese Linguistics derives from two distinct but related fields of knowledge. In one, the objective is to deepen our understanding of Chinese culture (in the broadest sense of the term) via its primary medium of expression – its language. Whether it is a piece of inscription to be deciphered, a philosophy to be analyzed, or a poem whose rimes are to be reconstructed, a solid knowledge of the language of that time is crucial. Such studies have a long tradition in Sinology; indeed, they were virtually the only ones which scholars interested in Chinese pursued, until recent times.

“The other field of knowledge is aimed at discovering the general principles underlying human language as a whole. The Chinese Language is particularly important here not only because of the time depth of its literature and the wealth of its dialects, but even more because of the unique properties of its syntax and phonology. It constitutes a tremendously rich resource for Linguistics to tap from the study of sound change to investigations of sociolinguistic variation.

“These two fields, Linguistics and Sinology, flow together in their concern with the Chinese Language. The central questions on the language remain the same: its structure, its ontogeny, and its phylogeny, as well as the interactions between the Chinese Language on the one hand, and Chinese thought, literature, and social systems on the other. Also of considerable interest are the questions which arise when the Chinese language comes into contact with other languages, be it in the controlled context of a language class or on the streets of an emigrant community. All in all, there is much to be done.

“Before today, papers on Chinese linguistics had to seek foster homes in diverse journals of general linguistics and in publications of various hues of orientalia. This situation was at best a nuisance, and at worst a serious impediment to the communication and progress of our field. In this journal, let us hope, Chinese Linguistics will have found its own voice.” (Wang, p.ii)

Keeping this mission in mind, the editorial board has comprised many knowledgeable and talented scholars. Former associate editors (listed in order of the year they began their service) were

Li Fang-Kuei 李方桂 (1973 – 1974), University of Hawaii
Edwin. G. Pulleyblank 蒲力本 (1973 – 1975), University of British Colombia
Mantaro J. Hashimoto 桥本万太郎 (1973 – 1987), Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
Goran Malmqvist 马悦然 (1973 – 1989), University of Stockholm
Lyu Shuxiang 吕叔湘 (1979 – 1996), Institute of Linguistics of Chinese Social Science Academy
Rudolph C. Troike 屈乐凯 (1982 -1986), Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, D.C.

The current associate editors (listed in order of the year they began their service along with their areas of expertise) are
Cheng Chin-Chuan 郑锦全 (1973-), Academia Sinica, Taipei
(Computational Linguistics, Dialectology)
Matthew Chen 陈渊泉 (1976-), University of California, San Diego
(Phonology, especially tones)
James Tai 戴浩一 (1976-), National Chung-Cheng University, Taipei
(Functional Linguistics)
Ovid Tzeng 曾志朗 (1979-), Academia Sinica, Taipei
(Neurolinguistics, Cognitive Science)
Alain Peyruabe 贝罗贝 (1988-), CRLAO, Paris
(Historical Linguistics)
Mei Tsu-Lin 梅祖麟 (1989-), Cornell University
(Historical Linguistics)
Huang Chu-Ren 黄居仁 (1992-), Academia Sinica, Taipei and Hong Kong Polytechnic University
(Computational Linguistics, Semantics)
Shen Zhongwei 沈钟伟 (1994-), University of Massachusetts, Amherst
(Language Change, Phonology)
Thomas Hun-Tak Lee 李行德 (1997-), Chinese University of Hong Kong
(Language Acquisition)
Hillary Chappell 曹茜蕾 (1999-), CRLAO, Paris
(Dialectology, Grammar)

Moreover, invited reviewers and authors published in of Journal of Chinese Linguistics have been distinguished international scholars from Asia, Europe, and North America. The international readership of Journal of Chinese Linguistics has been the academic community that has strongly supported the Journal and thus insured its well being over the decades of its existence.

For 35 years, The Journal of Chinese Linguistics, affectionately known as JCL, has been published by the Project on Linguistic Analysis (POLA), a very active and dedicated linguistic laboratory and research center, at the University of California, Berkeley. Prof. Ovid Tzeng once said “The International Association of Chinese Linguistics was established with a deep root in POLA as well as JCL.” JCL has been a virtual home where intellectual minds have been meeting, and new discoveries in Chinese linguistics have been presented. The papers published in JCL have been based on the principle, “These two fields, linguistics and sinology, flow together in their concern with the Chinese language.” (Wang, p.ii) Furthermore, JCL papers have been challenging the established ideas, encouraging debates, reporting new activities, annotating new publications, remembering pioneer generations of Chinese linguists, and indexing published works. Starting from 1982, JCL has also produced its Monograph Series that includes 22 volumes with distinguished linguistic themes that have been researched in depth. The body of knowledge has thus been nourished with invaluable contributions made to linguistic studies and Sinology, specifically, and to the science of language and culture of the world in general.

The indexes essentially summarize the contents of JCL and JCLMS. Early in its history, JCL was published three times a year from 1973 to 1974. Starting in 1975, it has been published twice a year in January and June. A total of 35 volumes with 72 issues were published from 1973 to 2007. The current size of the Journal by 2007 is 5” X 8”, and each issue has contained between 170 and 200 pages. Beginning in 1982, The JCL Monograph Series, with the same size as the journal, has been irregularly published with a total of 22 volumes; each volume has comprised between 200 to 500 pages, depending on the nature of the topic.

A general classification of the contents of JCL and JCLMS volumes reveals the following estimated distribution: Articles: 384 (482 if articles in the JCL Monograph Series are included); Discussions: 55; Reviews: 67; Reports: 50; Announcements: 26; Bibliographies: 34; Memoriam/Eulogies: 24; Indexes: 3; Editorial notices, 7, Addenda and Corrigenda: 22; and Monograph: 22. JCL’s articles are in English with few in Chinese (35~40); the majority of the abstracts are written in both English and Chinese except for abstracts from volume 1 to 6, number 1, which were in English only. Beginning with volume 31, number 2, subject keywords in both English and Chinese have been provided by authors.

JCL and JCLMS articles published from 1973 to 2007 have covered many aspects of the Chinese language. They have explored a variety of linguistic areas, such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, grammar, semantics, pragmatics, historical linguistics, comparative linguistics, computational linguistics, psycholinquistics, and sociolinguistics. Authors have also investigated languages in contact, language change, language families, and Chinese writing systems. The factors of culture, psychology, politics and social changes have also been intuitively blended in with scientific research processes in the papers. Research methods include experimental, comparative, as well as historical document review, linguistic reconstruction and many case studies.

As for JCL reviews and review articles, authors have examined in depth newly published books and stimulated lively and pointed discussions. Opinions from distinguished scholars have been published in JCL to respond to scholarly challenges. Reports on many interesting conferences have recorded the dates and places they were held, discussed the presentations of the scholars, and possible publications related to the conferences. These reports serve as valuable references to topics that were discussed at certain periods. Announcements of newly established organizations and journals, new books, and coming conferences are brought to JCL readers’ attention. Bibliographies published in JCL are intended to update the scholarly community in regard to new trends of research in Chinese linguistics; also included are lists of annotated theses, dissertations, and newly published books. As a voice of the virtual community of Chinese linguistic research, JCL has been paying its deepest respect to all pioneering scholars passed away as prominent scholars have contributed memoriam and eulogies over the years. The Monograph Series encompasses newly researched knowledge in depth and covers such topics as phonetics, tone, sound change, grammar, syntax, comparative linguistics, etymology, Chinese dialects and their written form, the formation of the Chinese language, languages in contact, the biological aspect of language, and much more.

These indexes will serve the scholarly community as tools for researching related topics; as a result, an effort has been made to provide a title index for every five volumes in volume 5.2, 10.2, and 16.1. To continue the indexing tradition, the current effort for which we have provided this introduction, is to index JCL and JCLMS by volume/number, title, author and subject; and also included are its useful citations, abstracts and classified subject keywords.

These indexes observe both Western and Chinese indexing practices, so that the newly created indexes are summaries of the JCL and JCLMS contents, as “representations of published items” (Lancaster) guided by the bibliographical practice of The Library of Congress of America. The indexes as a whole are also rooted in Chinese bibliographical tradition which was started by Liu Xiang 刘向 of the Han dynasty: “每一书已,[刘]向辄条起篇目,撮其旨意,奏而录之” (Yuan, p. 1) [After going through each book, Liu Xiang immediately wrote down its title and summarized its content in writing] (translation by the writer of this introduction). And in doing so, aims that, “部次条别,将以辨章学术,考镜源” (Zhang) [By arranging different terms in order, compositions, understandings, and methodologies can be differentiated for examining the origin and development of them] (translation by the writer of this introduction).

In contrast to the previous title indexes published in JCL, this cumulative indexes volume has five indexes in two parts, namely, Index I, 1.JCL Volumes 1~35, 2. JCLMS Numbers 1~22, which are organized by volume/number and comprise citation and abstract/brief description/introduction information. Index II, 3. Titles, 4. Authors, 5. Classified Subjects, with each section having its own detailed information (see the following chart). For detailed explanations to the two parts of the indexes, the reader should please refer to “Explanatory Notes to Index I” and “Explanatory Notes to Index II.” Index I serves as a microcosm of the contents of JCL and JCLMS, while Index II reflects the users’ search interests. In other words, Index II aims to help the users to locate their particular interests, such as a title, an author, or a subject area with designation information, such as volume and issue numbers; and Index I can provide them reference with abstract in both English and Chinese, in the hope of satisfying users’ further curiosity on their specific topics. Our hope is that the indexes will aid in identifying topics that have been studied and inspiring what will need to be studied by Chinese language scholars. The two parts of indexes can be outlined as following:

CUMULATIVE INDEXES
JOURNAL OF CHINESE LINGUISTICS (JCL) VOLUMES 1-35 (1973~2007)
JCL MONOGRAPH SERIES (JCLMS) NUMBERS 1-22 (1982~2007)

INDEX I
1. JCL Volumes 1-35
2. JCLMS Numbers 1-22

INDEX II (JCL and JCLMS combined)
3. Titles
4. Authors (with citations)
5. Classified Subjects
5.1. Topics
5.2. Languages
5.3. Names of Persons
5.4. Organizations
5.5. Publications
5.6. Meetings

The correlation between volume and year is shown in the following chart and can be used as a handy reference, which is on each index section page and the last page of this book (see the Table of Contents).

CORRESPONDENCE OF JCL VOLUMES AND JCLMS NUMBERS WITH PUBLICATION YEARS
学报卷别及专著卷号出版年份对照表
JCL vol. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
JCL year 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07
MONO vol. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22
MONO year 82 85 91 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 97 97 99 99 99 01 01 02 03 03 04 07

With our limited knowledge in the field of linguistics, the indexes, especially the Classified Subjects Index need more advice from Chinese Linguistics scholars and so we wholeheartedly invite suggestions and advice for improving these indexes. The Journal of Chinese Linguistics has come a long way with its mission to give voice to and publicize new discoveries of the language of China and to serve the academic community of Chinese Linguists. These indexes, by observing and supporting this same mission, enhance the scholarly communication and research along with other bibliographical efforts for the various fields of Chinese linguistics, in both printed and online formats. The editor’s hope in doing research across boundaries and disciplines, envisioned 35 years ago, has become a reality today: “Chinese Linguistics derives from two distinct but related fields of knowledge. In one, the objective is to deepen our understanding of Chinese culture (in the broadest sense of the term) via its primary medium of expression – its language. … The other field of knowledge is aimed at discovering the general principles underlying human language as a whole. … In this journal, let us hope, Chinese Linguistics will have found its own voice.”

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Wang, William S-Y. 1967. Bibliography of Chinese Linguistics. Current Trends in Linguistics. Volume II, Linguistics in East Asia and South East Asia: 188-499.
____. 1970. Project DOC: Its Methodological Basis. Journal of the American Oriental Society. 90: 57-66
____. 1973. Chinese Linguistics. Journal of Chinese Linguistics. 1.1: ii. Berkeley, California: Project on Linguistic Analysis.
Wang, William S-Y. & Anatole Lyovin. 1970. CLIBOC: Chinese Linguistics Bibliography on Computer. London and New York: Cambridge University Press.
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Xu, Liping许礼平编. 1980.《中国语文索引 1952~1966》 香港 : 香港中文大学中国文化硏究所.
Xu, Liejiong & Wang Zhijie 徐烈炯 & 王志洁主编. 2001.《汉语语言学书目》北京:外语教学与研究出版社.
Yang, Paul Fu-mien 杨福绵. 1974. Chinese Linguistics : A Selected and Classified Bibliography 中国语言学参考书. Hong Kong: Chinese University of Hong Kong.
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_____. 1985. Chinese Lexicology and Lexicography: A Selected and Classified Bibliography中国词汇学及辞典学分类参考书目. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.
Yang, Xiujun杨秀君编. 1986. 《中国语言学论文索引1981-1985》长春 : 吉林省图书馆学会.
Yaruss, Jonathan Scott.. 1990. DOC 1988: The Modernization of a Chinese Dialect Dictionary on Computer. Computers and the Humanities. 24.3: 207-219.
Yuan, Xueliang 袁学良. 2002. 《古代书目分类法与文学典籍崖略》成都: 巴蜀书社.
Zhang, Xuecheng 章学诚. 《清 ∙ 校雠通义》
Zhongguo Kexueyuan Yuyan Yanjiusuo中国科学院語言研究所編. 1979.《中国語言学論文索引1900~1963 》香港: 生活, 读书, 新知三联书店.
______. 2003.《中囯语言学论文索引1991-1995》北京: 商务印书馆.
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Zhongguo Shehui Kexueyuan Yuyan Yanjiusuo …中国社会科学院语言研究所 《中国语言学年鉴》编委会 编. 2006. 《中国语言学年鉴1999~2003》北京: 商务印书馆.

Abstract 摘要
On page 1, 231, 323, 369, 453, 588

See also JCL website: http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/journal/jcl/pub_cl_vol.htm

分别出现在页数: 1, 231, 323, 369, 453, 588

请参考本学报网页: http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/journal/jcl/pub_cl_vol.htm

Abstract 摘要
The cumulative indexes to Journal of Chinese Linguistics (JCL) and Journal of Chinese Linguistics Monograph Series (JCLMS) are in two parts: Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 and JCLMS Numbers 1~22, which is organized by volume / numbers and comprises citation and abstract/brief description/introduction information; Index II: Authors, Titles, Classified Subjects comprises detailed information, combining both JCL and JCLMS entries, for these categories. Index I acts as a microcosm of the complete contents of JCL and JCLMS, while Index II serves the users’ various research interests. In other words, Index II aims to help the user to locate a title, an author, or a subject area with designation information, such as the volume and issue number, while Index I provides detailed abstracts/introductions, in order to satisfy the user’s curiosity about the particular perspective of articles in JCL and JCLMS. Here we will discuss Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 & JCLMS Numbers 1~22, with examples, in the following order: scope, arrangement, format, relationship to Index II, source authority, and special treatments. Finally we have provided example cases to show how to use the two indexes together. Hopefully, the questions about how to use the indexes will be answered along the way.

Scope:
Index I comprises the information on the volume designation, citation, abstract/brief description/introduction for all published pieces in JCL volumes, 1~35 and JCLMS numbers, 1~22. If a JCL article does not have an abstract, such as a book review, a brief description about the nature of the content is provided. If a JCL monograph volume is a single author’s work and does not have an abstract, then the authors’ introduction or a paragraph with summary content takes the place of the abstract. If a JCL monograph volume comprises works by several authors, the volume editor’s introduction is provided first and is then followed by the abstracts/titles from individual papers. With its citations and abstracts/brief descriptions/introductions, Index I can provide more detailed information about the articles themselves in relationship to Index II: Titles, Authors, Classified Subjects.

Arrangement:
Index I is arranged in the order of first 1. JCL Volumes 1~35 and then 2. JCLMS Numbers 1~22. Each section’s contents is sorted according to the order of JCL volumes and JCLMS numbers. The reader should please refer to “Index I List of JCL Volumes and JCLMS Numbers with Pagination” according to the Table of Contents.

Format:
Arranged by JCL volumes and JCLMS numbers designations, each published piece contains the citation and abstract/brief description/introduction in both English and Chinese if available, and book/periodical titles in all indexes are not italicized for example,

Volume 9, Number 1, Article 5 = 9 卷 1 期, 文章 5
Alleton, Viviane. 1981. Final particles and expression of modality in modern Chinese. Journal of Chinese Linguistics. 9.1, 91-115. = 艾乐桐. 1981. 说 “”呢””. 中国语言学报. 9卷1期, 91-115.

Sentence-final particles are one of the ways by which a Chinese sentence is modulated. They are part of a larger system which includes verb determinants such as adverbs and modal auxiliary verbs as well as sentence intonation. This paper looks specifically at the particle ne 呢 and its relationship to sentence intonation. Several different uses of ne are described which have the common function of appealing in some way to the listener’s active participation. (9.1, article 5, Alleton) 所谓“语气词”,只是语气成分的一个部分。如果认为语气的功能是表示说话人对自己的话的态度,那么副词,能愿动词也可以叫做“语气成分”。本文简单论述了句尾的“语气词”,特别是语气词和语调的关系,通过分析有关“呢”的几个问题来说明这种关系:疑问语调句子中的“呢”,陈述语调句子中的“呢”,用来表示停顿的“呢”。这几种“呢”的共同特点是在对话中争取听者介入说话者的语意:促使听者思考以回答说话者提的问题,或促使听者同意说话者的陈述,或引起听者的注意。(9.1, 文章 5, Alleton 艾乐桐)

Journal of Chinese Linguistics, Monograph Series, Number 11
中国语言学报, 专著系列, 卷号11
Shen, Zhongwei. 1997. Exploring the Dynamic Aspect of Sound Change. Journal of Chinese Linguistics Monograph Series. No.11. Berkeley, California: Project on Linguistic Analysis. = 沈钟伟. 1997. [译]: 语音动态变化探讨. 中国语言学报专著系列, 11. 美国加州伯克莱: 语言学分析中心.

CONCLUSION (P. 172)
One of the significant issues raised by the lexical diffusion theory is what the mechanism of sound change is. In order to understand the change mechanism better, this study starts with examining of the basic concepts of the theory of lexical diffusion, and the evidence that supports the theory. After careful consideration of the old evidence, we realized that 1) to prove the viewpoints of lexical diffusion, we need richer data drawn from speech communities, and 2) to account for the dynamics process of sound change requires a diffusion theory at a population level. If the original item is a book review, report, bibliography, eulogy, errata, or announcement, a brief description is provided; for example,

Volume 1, Number 1, Article 8 =1 卷 1 期, 文章 8
Li, Ying-che. 1973. A Grammar of spoken Chinese. By Yuen Ren Chao. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1968. Pp. 1109. Journal of Chinese Linguistics. 1.1, 126-151. = 李英哲. 1973. [译]:《汉语口语语法》. 赵元任著. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1968. 1109 页. 中国语言学报. 1卷1期, 126-151.
Book review (1.1, article 8, Li)
书评 (1.1, 文章 8, 李)

Relationship between Index I and Index II:
The contents of Index I can be outlined as indicated below. As the reader can see, it acts like the condensed version of JCL and JCLMS contents. When a user is interested in a particular title, author’ name, or a subject keyword in Index II, then he or she can look up the details in Index I for the full citation and abstract/brief description/introduction details.

CUMULATIVE INDEXES
JOURNAL OF CHINESE LINGUISTICS (JCL) VOLUMES 1-35 (1973~2007)
JCL MONOGRAPH SERIES (JCLMS) NUMBERS 1-22 (1982~2007)

INDEX I
1. JCL Volumes 1-35
2. JCLMS Numbers 1-22

INDEX II (JCL and JCLMS combined)
3. Titles
4. Authors (with citations)
5. Classified Subjects
5.1. Topics
5.2. Languages
5.3. Names of Persons
5.4. Organizations
5.5. Publications
5.6. Meetings

Source Authority: Index I has been generated according to the published contents of JCL (Journal of Chinese Linguistics) and JCLMS (Journal of Chinese Linguistics Monograph Series). The article numbers, such as “1.1, article 8, Li,” provided in the index are generated according to their order in an issue. Abstracts and citations in Chinese are generated according to their availability in the published contents; some have been translated by the compiler. Phonetic symbols have been double-checked against the original works, however, due to technical input problems, some errors in the use of these symbols may have been introduced.

Special Treatments:
1) Abstracts: In case there is no English or Chinese abstract in the published content, only the abstracts in the available language have been provided (see example 1-2 in the following section: Examples of Special Treatments).
2) Book/Periodical Titles: In all indexes, book/periodical titles are not italicized.
3) Chinese characters: As for the Chinese characters in a citation or an abstract of the published content, simplified characters are used.
4) Chinese translations: The Chinese translation for citations has been provided only for the reader’s reference when the author of an original writing did not provide it. No abstracts in Chinese have been provided for those articles in JCL published from Volume 1 Number 1 to Volume 6 Number 1, since this was the editorial practice during that period of publication. And if an author did not provide a Chinese abstract for his/her article in JCL, there is no Chinese translation for the article in this index. As for JCLMS, if the author or editor did not provide the Chinese abstract or introduction for the monograph, then there will be no Chinese abstract or introduction for it.
5) Issue and article numbers: Issue number is presented as a decimal, for example, volume 7, number 1 will be 7.1; so (7.1, article 4, Mei) and (7.1, 文章4, 梅) at the end of an abstract indicates the designation of the abstract.
6) Phonetic Symbol: although we would like to eliminate all erroneous input of phonetic symbols, readers may still find some incorrect symbols due to unrecognized fonts; we request that readers please kindly write to the editorial office of Journal of Chinese Linguistics and bring any needed corrections to our attention.

Examples of Special Treatments:
Example 1: No English abstract
Example 2: No Chinese abstract

Cases for Using Index I with Index II:
The reader may now know how to use Index I after having read the above explanations. The following cases aim to further exemplify how to use Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 and JCLMS Numbers 1~22 with Index II: Titles, Authors, and Classification Subjects (Cases 1-4).

Case 1: From Index I to Index II:
Case 2: From Index II: 3. Titles to Index I

Abstract 摘要
The cumulative indexes of Journal of Chinese Linguistics (JCL) and Journal of Chinese Linguistics Monograph Series (JCLMS) are in two parts: Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 and JCLMS Numbers 1~22, which is organized by volume numbers and comprises citation and abstract information; Index II: Authors, Titles, Classified Subjects, comprises detailed information, combining both JCL and JCLMS entries, for these categories. Index I acts as a microcosm of the contents of JCL and JCLMS, while Index II serves the users’ various research interests, that is, it aims to help the user to locate a title, an author, or a subject area with designation information, such as the volume and issue number. Index I, on the other hand, provides detailed abstracts/introductions in order to satisfy the user’s curiosity about the particular perspective of articles in JCL and JCLMS.

Here we will explain Index II: Titles, Authors, and Classified Subjects, with examples, in the following order: scope, arrangement, format, relationship to Index I, source authority, and special treatments. Finally we have provided example cases to show how to use Index II with Index I. Hopefully, any questions about how to use the indexes are answered along the way.

Scope:
Index II comprises three indexes, namely, Titles, Authors (with citations), and Classified Subjects (with six subcategories of Topics, Languages, Names of Persons, Organizations, Publications, and Meetings). These are the basis for searching and browsing; in other words, one can search a title, an author’s last names, or a classified subject keyword in these indexes, and then refer to Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 and JCLMS Numbers 1~22 according to volume/number designation information, to search for abstracts and more.

Arrangement:
Index II is arranged in the order of Titles, Authors, and Classified Subjects. Classified Subjects is subdivided into six categories for searching Topics, Languages, Names of Persons, Organizations, Publications, and Meetings. Within each index, the entries are listed in an alphabetical order. Please refer to the “Table of Contents” and “Index II List of Titles, Authors, Classified Subjects with Pagination” for the detailed page arrangement.

Format:
Format of Titles, Authors, or Classified Subjects is specified in following examples, and book/periodical titles are not italicized for all indexes.

Titles (alphabetically arranged without “a” “an” “the” as a beginning word):
Alveolarization in Cantonese: a case of lexical diffusion (7.1, article 10, Bauer) = [译]: 粤语齿龈化: 词汇扩散案例研究 (7.1, 文章 10, Bauer包睿舜)
Ambiguity in context-induced semantic changes: the history of the Chinese ba construction (mono 10, article 12, Sun) = [译]:语境导致歧义的语义变化:汉语把字结构的历史 (专著系列, 10, 文章12, 孙)

Authors (alphabetically arranged by the first letters of authors’ last names as they have appeared in their articles, including articles by multiple authors):
Bauer, Robert S. 1996. In memoriam: Søren Christian Egerod (1923-1995). Journal of Chinese Linguistics. 24.1, 192-193. = 包睿舜. 1996. [译]: 悼念: 易家乐 (1923-1995). 中国语言学报. 24卷1期, 192-193.
Bauer , Robert S. 包睿舜
Cheung, Kwan-hin & Bauer, Robert S.. 2002. The Representation of Cantonese with Chinese Character. Journal of Chinese Linguistics Monograph Series. No.18. Berkeley, California: Project on Linguistic Analysis. = 张群显 & 包睿舜. 2002. 以汉字写粤语. 中国语言学报专著系列, 18. 美国加州伯克莱: 语言学分析中心.
Bauer, Robert S. 2006. The stratification of English loanwords in Cantonese. Journal of Chinese Linguistics. 34.2, 172-191. = 包睿舜. 2006. 粤语中英语借词的层次. 中国语言学报. 34卷2期, 172-191.

Classified Subjects: In this category, subject keywords have been classified into six different subcategories to identify the topic or main content of an article. For instance, a keyword for a name of a person suggests that an article has discussed the person and his writing(s); a keyword for an organization indicates that an article is devoted to discussing this organization; a keyword for a publication means that an article is a review article or a contribution discussing a published work. In the same way, keywords are related to topics, languages, and meetings.

Search Topics
Accents and accentuation
口音及重音度
12.2, article 4, Chen

Search Languages
Austroasiatic languages
南亚语言
1.1, article 2, Li
11.1, article 5, Norman
31.1, article 1, Schuessler
mono 8, article 5, Pan
mono 8, article 4, Li

Search Names of Persons
Wang, William S.-Y.
王士元
14.2, article 4, Lien
28.1, article 6, Lee

Search Organizations
CRLAO (Centre de Recherches Linguistiques sur l’Asie Orientale)–France–Paris
东亚语言研究中心–法国–巴黎
2.3, article 8, Alleton (Announcement)

Search Publications
Cahiers de linguistique asie orientales
东亚语言学报
6.2, article 13, (Announcement)
Journal of Chinese linguistics – Book reviews
中国语言学报–书评
1.1, article 8, Li (Chao)
1.2, article 6, Chan (Alleton)
Search Meetings
First Hong Kong conference on language and society
香港第一届语言及社会学术会议
16.1, article 11, (Conference report)

Relationship between Index II and Index I:
Index II is like the index(es) at the end of a book while Index I is like a condensed version of JCL and JCLMS (see the chart below). So, in Index II one can find a title, an author’s name, or a subject keyword with volume designation information, and then one can go to Index I to find out more information about a title, an author’s writings, or a subject area.

CUMULATIVE INDEXES
JOURNAL OF CHINESE LINGUISTICS (JCL) VOLUMES 1-35 (1973~2007)
JCL MONOGRAPH SERIES (JCLMS) NUMBERS 1-22 (1982~2007)

INDEX I
1. JCL Volumes 1-35
2. JCLMS Numbers 1-22

INDEX II (JCL and JCLMS combined)
3. Titles
4. Authors (with citations)
5. Classified Subjects
5.1. Topics
5.2. Languages
5.3. Names of Persons
5.4. Organizations
5.5. Publications
5.6. Meetings

Source Authority:
Index II: 3. Titles was generated according to the titles in the published contents of of JCL and JCLMS; some Chinese titles were translated by the compiler.
Index II: 4. Authors was generated according to the names and information appearing in the published contents of JCL and JCLMS or other official publications. Only one spelling kind of an author is used.
Index II: 5. Classified Subjects includes six categories, namely: Topics, Languages, Names of Persons, Organizations, Publications, and Meetings. The subject keywords and keyword-strings, based on the American Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and authors’ keywords in their abstracts or articles, were first generated from a close reading of each abstract/entry in JCL and JCLMS, with a total of about 770 entries; if any uncertainties arose, further reading of the article was conducted. In general, three to six keywords were generated for each article/entry. As a result, more than 3,500 keywords have thus been generated with their Chinese translations, which were further checked against 英汉语言学词汇 An English-Chinese Lexicon of Linguistics. In order to have these subject keywords for easy use, we next classified the 3,500 plus subject keywords and keyword-strings into the six categories mentioned above. Since the compiler is not an expert in all linguistic fields, misunderstanding and misinterpretation may be unavoidable in this edition. However, we earnestly solicit the help of JCL readers to send us their corrections and suggestions, so that later versions of this section can be improved and its usefulness enhanced.

Special Treatments:
1) Book/Periodical Titles: In all indexes, book/periodical titles are not italicized.
2) Chinese Character: In Index II: 3. Titles, 4. Authors, 5. Classified Subjects, simplified Chinese characters are used.
3) Chinese Translation:
Index II 3. Titles: If no Chinese titles were provided for a publication then Chinese translation title has been provided for selected entries which meanings are straight forward (see Examples of Special Treatments—Titles below).
Index II 4. Authors: The Chinese names of authors are provided according to the JCL publications and occasionally to other published works (see Examples of Special Treatments —Authors below).
Index II 5. Classified Subjects: The Chinese subject keywords are translated and provided for reference only (see Examples of Special Treatments —Classified Subjects below).
4) Correspondence of JCL Volumes and JCLMS numbers with Publication Years: on each subtitle page (see Table of Contents), the following chart can be found for easy reference when a reader has a designation information of a JCL and JCLMS entry from Index II, such as 1.1, article 8, Li, which is published in 1973:

JCL Vol. 卷别 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
JCL year 年份73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07
JCLMS No.卷号 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
JCLMS year 年份 82 85 91 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 97 97 99 99 99 01 01 02 03 03 04 07
5) Designation: The Titles and Classified Subjects Indexes include designation information such as 10.1, article 2, Sobelman; here 10.1 means volume 10, number 1; “article” means a published item that can be an article, a discussion, a review article, a report, a eulogy, a bibliography, or an announcement.
6) Phonetic Symbol: although we would like to eliminate all erroneous input of phonetic symbols, readers may still find some incorrect symbols due to unrecognized fonts; we request that readers please kindly write to the editorial office of Journal of Chinese Linguistics and bring any needed corrections to our attention.
7) Subject Keyword Classification: In Index II 5. Classified Subjects, special keywords found in author(s) article, such as BA construction, Le, or Dak, are used as subject keywords, in order to reflect some topics (5.1. Topics). Since various languages and dialects are discussed in JCL and JCLMS, an independent category is provided as for language subject keywords (5.2. Languages). If a person is discussed in depth in an article, the name is selected as a subject keyword (5.3. Names of Persons). According to the same principle, if an organization is the main topic of an article, its name will be selected as a subject keyword (5.4. Organizations). If a publication is reviewed and discussed in an article, it will be selected as a subject keyword. The types of JCL and JCLMS article, such as book review, report, memoriam/eulogy, etc., are classified under the subject keywords Journal of Chinese Linguistics– (5.5. Publications), Name of conferences and workshops are grouped under topics in an independent category (5.6. Meetings) (see Example 4 in Examples of Special Treatments —Classified Subjects).
8) Subject Keyword for Cross References: If an article touched on two or more topics, then two or three subject keywords have been assigned, for examples:
Phonology
Grammar, comparative and general–Phonology
Cantonese dialects—Phonology
… and more
So when the reader searches a term they may want to search for all the related categories. (see example 3 in Example of Special Cases—Classified Subjects).
9) Subject Keyword for Article Types: JCL and JCLMS articles are written in different formats. As for complete lists of discussions, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, memoriam/eulogies, announcements, and errata, etc., readers should please look up the term Journal of Chinese Linguistics in the section of Index II 5. Classified Subjects 5.5. Publications (see example 5 in Example of Special Treatments—Classified Subjects) .
10) Title: The reader should note that the indefinite and definite articles “a”, “an” and “the” at the beginning of titles in Index II: 3. Titles have been eliminated for sorting purposes.
11) Book Review: Section 5.3. Names of Persons includes entries of authors of books that have been reviewed in JCL; that is, if a book has been reviewed this is indicated by (Review) which follows the surname of the book reviewer. Section 5.5 Publications includes the titles of books that have been reviewed in JCL, and again this is indicated in the entry by (Review) which follows the surname of the reviewer. (see example 6 in Example of Special Treatments—Classified Subjects).

Examples of Special Treatments:
Examples of Special Treatments–Titles
Examples of Special Treatments—Authors
Examples of Special Treatments – Classified Subjects

Cases for Using Index II with Index I:
After one has read the above explanations, the reader may now know how to use Index II: Titles, Authors, Classified Subjects. The following cases can further show how to use Index II with Index I: JCL Volumes 1~35 and JCLMS Numbers 1~22 (Case 1-4).

Case 1: From Index II: 3. Titles to Index I
Case 2: From Index II: 4. Authors to Index I

Abstract 摘要
See “Article” link in PDF file (open access)

请参考 “文章” 链接 的 PDF文档

Abstract 摘要
See “Article” link in PDF file (open access)

请参考 “文章” 链接 的 PDF文档

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